The A Words

Just curious: should we consider appropriation and assimilation dirty words? Could we make just as compelling a case that they constitute forms of flattery?

Posted in Pop Culture, Race in Mississippi | 14 Comments

Why Go to College?

As deadlines for early admission programs approach, it may be worth it to ask yourselves what you want from college. A massive amount of data shows that people with degrees out earn those without them. In that sense, going to college seems to be a sound investment. (I must add, though, that my father is a financial planner, and works every day with people who operate forklifts or work on plumbing who will retire long before I do.)

James Fallows has written about the ageless conundrums faced by college students–and the parents who bankroll them–for decades. He’s posting a series of responses to questions about the value of college on his blog. The difficulty lies in balancing the cost of the education you want against the prospect of future earnings. That’s why graduates in medical fields rack up more college debt than anyone else–they can be assured they’ll get a good return on their investment.

And beyond the issue of cost, you have the issue of pragmatism: is a degree merely a credential–a precursor for some entry level job–or should it reflect a specialized interest of ability, or both? I suspect that all these questions have answers that shift like sandbars. However, since y’all are about to take those courses, and accumulate those debts, it would be wise to contemplate your responses to them.

Posted in Education | 8 Comments

Why Binge?

Over the last year, I’ve watched Ozark, The Man in the Green Castle, Bosch, Dear White People, The Keepers–just to name a few. My viewing involves a modicum of guilt. I’m enjoying myself, but I occasionally find myself watching for the purpose of seeing a season through, rather than for the esthetic pleasure of seeing a great story unfold before my eyes, or for great cinematography, or unbelievable acting. I’ve become more adept at finding plot points that will carry over from one episode to the next.

But I worry that my viewing encourages bad behavior–not on my part, of course, but on the part of studios that no longer feel the need to make taut, well-crafted stories. I haven’t seen a series (or an “original,” as they’re being called now) that wouldn’t make for a better movie. Why spend 12 hours watching something that should be boiled down to 90 minutes? What am I getting from spending the additional time? I’d like to say that the depth of characterization has improved, but I don’t think that’s the case. Is the the future of entertainment?

Posted in Pop Culture | 12 Comments

The Sun Sets on DACA

Donald Trump won the presidency at least in part because he insisted on the need for immigration reform. His efforts to build a wall traversing our border with Mexico have stalled. However, he has recently signed an executive order rescinding the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. DACA allowed people who were brought illegally by their parents to stay, provided that they met certain criteria. Is Trump’s new initiative sound? What might his plans reveal about the efficiency of ruling via executive order?

Posted in National Politics | 13 Comments

A Quick Correction Regarding Our System

In an interview with a radio host this morning, Gov. Phil Bryant responded to a question about legislation to change the state flag by saying that the issue ought to be put before the people because we live in a “direct democracy.”

Actually, we don’t.

We live in a representative democracy. That was the intent of the framers from the get go, as we will see when we turn to Federalist Paper #10 next month.

Gov. Bryant’s comments result from his broader irritation with the media. He also said in the interview that he couldn’t talk about anything that’s doing well in Mississippi without being asked questions about “flags and statues,” which he found “frustrating” because such questions make it harder to put the state in the best possible light.

The interview raised a couple of interesting questions. First, should we trust voters to make the best decisions about sensitive issues? If not, where should we turn? Why would leaders want referendums on such issues? Second, is it the right time for Mississippi to worry about rehabilitating its image, or are there other issues to address?

Posted in Politics, Race in Mississippi | 19 Comments

Enjoy the eclipse, y’all

Thinking about the sun for the last month or so has brought me to an obvious question: what has prevented sunbelt states like Mississippi from investing more heavily in solar power? For the amount of money wasted on the Kemper Power Plant–the total costs for the plant now top $6 billion–Mississippi Power could have subsidized rooftop solar panels for nearly half the state’s households.

Some of the challenges faced by renewable energy sources are regulatory; some involve engineering. What will it take to make Mississippi greener?

Posted in Politics, Science | 20 Comments

Welcome to MSMS; Tragedy in Charlottesville

Welcome aboard, Class of 2019! Welcome back, Class of 2018! If you haven’t blogged here before, the ground rules follow. All posts must be respectful and must refrain from ad hominems; discuss ideas rather than each other. If you can link articles that inform your position, please do so. Only MSMS students are allowed to post.

We’ll discuss tough things from beginning to end. Up first: President Trump’s statement about the violence that erupted during alt-right protests in Virginia this weekend. Here’s the text:

“We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence, on many sides. On many sides. It’s been going on for a long time in our country. Not Donald Trump, not Barack Obama. This has been going on for a long, long time.”

What is President Trump trying to say? What have so many people taken issue with the way he expressed himself? Is there a wiser course of action?

Update: President Trump spoke on the matter again yesterday. Here’s the New York Times report of his comments.

Posted in National Politics | 19 Comments

Municipal Elections Took Place Last Night. . .

. . .and there were tight races all over the state. A few observers have begun banging the drum for an interesting change to election laws: they would like to require candidates for public office to offer proof that they have paid their taxes. The origin of this demand, so far as I can tell, is a blend of skepticism born of Watergate and of our current president. I suspect substantial legal barriers would prevent such proposals from making it past legal challenges. Would they help or hinder our form of democracy?

 

Posted in Politics | 21 Comments

One for the Late American Drama class

What questions do you want to ask Wayne Self about Upstairs?

Posted in Books, Education, Gender Issues, Music | 11 Comments

A Chance to be 49th

Mississippi doesn’t embrace many chances to avoid winning last place, but here’s an easy one: we’re one of the last two states to recognize “Confederate Memorial Day.” Alabama is the other one. Regardless of what one feels about our state flag–I think it’s hopelessly tone-deaf at best–it ought to be easy to avoid a state holiday that by definition will alienate a substantial portion of its citizens. How wonderful it would be to let Alabama serve the union as the last reminder of a state that legitimized slavery.

Meanwhile, on the other side of the river, New Orleans is removing four monuments to the confederacy. I have as many misgivings about this as I do about today’s state holiday. I prefer what’s happened to the confederate statue at Ole Miss–an idea that seems more respectful of all parties involved.

UPDATE: A tip of the hat to Terrence Johnson, an MSMS alumnus who shared Jarvis DeBerry’s strong argument against leaving the statues up. (DeBerry is an MSMS alumnus also–he spoke at last year’s graduation.)

Posted in Politics, Pop Culture, Race in Mississippi | 29 Comments